Fessler: “Aristides und Themistocles”

180,00

I-II. volume (bound, complete)

First edition.

Berlin, 1792. F. Maurer.

Contemporary, ornately gilded spine in leather. 204 mm

Category:
Description

I-II. volume (bound, complete)

First edition.

Berlin, 1792. F. Maurer.

Contemporary, ornately gilded spine in leather. 204 mm

Interesting things about Marcus Aurelius

He was a practitioner of Stoicism, and his writing, known as Meditations, is an important source of the modern understanding of ancient Stoic philosophy. During his reign, the Roman Empire defeated a revitalized Parthian Empire in the East. In central Europe, Aurelius fought the Marcomanni, Quadi and Sarmatians with success during the Marcomannic Wars, although the threat of the Germanic peoples began to represent a troubling reality for the Empire.

The persecution of Christians increased during the reign of Marcus Aurelius.

His death in 180 is considered to be the end of the Pax Romana and the increasing instability in the west that followed has traditionally been seen as the beginning of the eventual fall of the Western Roman Empire.

His family originated in Ucubi, a small town southeast of Cordoba in Iberian Baetica. Aurelius’ family rose to prominence in the late first century AD. His great-grandfather, Marcus Annius Verus, was a senator and ex-praetor. After his father’s death, Aurelius was raised by his paternal grandfather who, according to Roman Law, had always retained the “patria potestas” over his son and grandson. Marcus was raised in his parents’ home on the Caelian Hill, a district he would affectionately refer to as “my Caelian.” Marcus’ grandfather owned his own palace beside the Lateran, where Marcus would spend much of his childhood. Marcus thanks his grandfather for teaching him, “good character and avoidance of bad temper.” He was less fond of the mistress his grandfather took and lived with after the death of Rupilia Faustina, his wife.