First edition, first impression of Apsley Cherry – Garrard – The Worst Journey in the World – Constable, 1922

1.900,00

First edition, first impression of Apsley Cherry – Garrard – The Worst Journey in the World – Constable, 1922

Description

First edition, first issue, ‘Cherry-Garrard’s book has often been referred to as the finest polar book ever written … a monument immortalizing the [Terra Nova] expedition in the annals of Antarctic exploration and geographic exploration in general’ (Rosove).

 

Apsley Cherry – Garrard – The Worst Journey in the World. Antarctic 1910-1913, 2 vol., FIRST EDITION, half-titles, 48 plates (6 colour, 10 folding panoramas), 5 maps (4 folding), occasional spotting in margins and to fore-edges, untrimmed inpublisher’s cloth-backed blue-grey boards, paper spine labels (browned and slightly chipped at corners), Constable & Co., 1922

v-lxiv, 585 pp.

22 x 14 cm

 

Owner’s name on front free endpapers.

 

On the return journey from the Pole, Scott reached the 82° 30′ S meeting point for the dog teams three days ahead of schedule, noting in his diary for 27 February 1912: “The dogs which would have been our salvation have evidently failed. Cherry had been given the task of using the dog teams to meet Scott’s party and assist them home, but in fact Cherry-Garrard did not penetrate beyond One Ton Depot, only 11 miles (18 km) distant from Scott’s final location where he and his companions froze to death.

In 1912–1913, Cherry-Garrard and other expedition members once again marched southward, this time to try to find traces of their lost comrades. Cherry-Garrard’s description of the frozen tent that contained three of them is one of the most dramatic sections of the book. Inside the tent were the remains of Scott and Cherry-Garrard’s two companions on the Worst Journey, Bowers and Wilson. Cherry-Garrard closes with a written meditation on the themes of self-sacrifice and heroism.