Herodotos

500,00

Historion logoi. (Graece). Historiarum libri IX. Gr (aece) et Lat (ine) ex L. Vallae interpretatione, cum adnotationibus Th. Galei et I. Gronovii. Editionem curavit et suas itemque L. C. Valckenarii notas adiecit P. Wesselingius. 2 parts in one volume, Amsterdam, Schouten, 1763. Folio. With engraved title, engraved title vign., Folded copper plate, 3 text copper plates and some engraved. endvign. 12 sheets, 868, 177 pages, 34 sheets contemporary vellum binding with gold-stamped Coat of arms superralibros on both lids (broken front joint, rear lid with traces of cuts, bumped, stained). (165) – Brunet III, 123. Ebert 9549. Schweiger I, 139:

“New review after manuscripts with the most useful notes of the previous explaners. The learned commentaries by Valckenar and Wesseling are very much appreciated.”

– Greek-Latin parallel text.

Broken joint, title stamped on verso, slightly stained.

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Herodotos

Historion logoi. (Graece). Historiarum libri IX. Gr (aece) et Lat (ine) ex L. Vallae interpretatione, cum adnotationibus Th. Galei et I. Gronovii. Editionem curavit et suas itemque L. C. Valckenarii notas adiecit P. Wesselingius. 2 parts in one volume, Amsterdam, Schouten, 1763. Folio. With engraved title, engraved title vign., Folded copper plate, 3 text copper plates and some engraved. endvign. 12 sheets, 868, 177 pages, 34 sheets contemporary vellum binding with gold-stamped Coat of arms superralibros on both lids (broken front joint, rear lid with traces of cuts, bumped, stained).
(165) – Brunet III, 123. Ebert 9549. Schweiger I, 139:

“New review after manuscripts with the most useful notes of the previous explaners. The learned commentaries by Valckenar and Wesseling are very much appreciated.”

– Greek-Latin parallel text.

Broken joint, title stamped on verso, slightly stained.

Fascinating facts about Herodotos

Herodotus has been called the ‘father of history’, as he invented the entire discipline. It was Cicero who gave Herodotus this title and it was Herodotus who first gave us the idea of the historian and ‘history’ as we now understand it. What made Herodotus special from previous chroniclers was his commitment to objectivity. He relied on evidence and the facts, and to draw conclusions from them.

However, Herodotus was probably influenced by an important, though largely forgotten, earlier writer. The geographer Hecateus of Miletus was probably an important influence on Herodotus, though the historian liked to dismiss Hecateus’ work.

Herodotus’ uncle was an epic poet who was often compared to the great epic poet Homer. Herodotus, an Asian Greek, was born in around 484 BC, just before the Persian war. His uncle Panyassis wrote an epic poem Heraclea, which was sadly lost, but which was compared favourably to Homer’s work.

The great Greek comic playwright Aristophanes poked fun at Herodotus. In several of his plays, Aristophanes mocked the father of history.

The great Sophocles one of the greatest writers of Greek tragedy was a friend of Herodotus and wrote a poem in his friend’s honour.