Homann’s heirs (“Erben”): “Maior Atlas Scholasticus…Mappis Homannianis”

7.900,00

Nuremberg c. 1750. Large folio, 52x31cm. Half calf (18th century spine, boards 19th century, upper board with title in paper pasted on). 36 double-page maps in contemporary colour.
World and the Continents in addition to the general maps. Some maps frayed along edges, some geographical names underlined in ink, dampstains, spots etc, but generally in good condition.

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Homann’s heris (“Erben”): “Maior Atlas Scholasticus…Mappis Homannianis”.

Nuremberg c. 1750. Large folio, 52x31cm. Half calf (18th century spine, boards 19th century, upper board with title in paper pasted on). 36 double-page maps in contemporary colour.
World and the Continents in addition to the general maps. Some maps frayed along edges, some geographical names underlined in ink, dampstains, spots etc, but generally in good condition.

Johann Homann – The man behind the maps

Although educated at a Jesuit school, and preparing for an ecclesiastical career, Homann quickly turned to engraving and cartography and in 1702 he founded his own publishing house. After a long period of Dutch domination in map publishing, his publishing house became the most important map and atlas producer in Germany.

Homann acquired renown as a leading German cartographer, and in 1715 was appointed Imperial Geographer by Emperor Charles VI. Giving such privileges to individuals was an added right that the Holy Roman Emperor enjoyed. What is more, in the same year he was also became the member of the Prussian Academy of Sciences in Berlin. Of particular significance to cartography were the imperial printing privileges These protected for a time the authors in all scientific fields such as printers, copper engravers, map makers and publishers. They were also very important as a recommendation for potential customers.

In 1716 Homann published his masterpiece named Grand Atlas of all the World. Numerous maps were made together with the engraver Christoph Weigel the Elder, who also published Siebmachers Wappenbuch.

The company carried on after his death as Homann heirs company.

This book is a highly decorative and detailed collection of maps with many place names, castles, monasteries, mountains, rivers and woods.